Tell Me About Kettlebells

[quote]Boris B wrote:
Yeah, like I said, maybe you should actually try using kettlebells before feeling the need to comment on them… Marketing is a different issue. When is the last time you saw an add for a supplement, routine, or piece of equipment that wasn’t accompanied by exaggerated claims?

I don’t mind people having an opinion, but if you’ve never tried an exercise, piece of equipment, training system/routine, etc., then I just don’t understand commenting on it with plenty of conviction and zero experience - JMO.
[/quote]

I agree. I didn’t stop lifting weights as much as I enjoy using kettlebells. I’ve pretty much read and watched all of Pavels material.

I love some of his stuff and some other stuff I just ignore, but then again having a background in Exercise and Sports Science and also engaging in a sport athletically in a semi-pro fashion helps me to decipher information and what is or isn’t useful for me. That’s what it comes down to in the end. You’ve really got to try something and give it a good attempt before you can decide whether it is good for you or not.

Some guys love long road work and it suits them fine and boxers have been using this method for years and years. I personally disagree with it for many reasons but years and years of pro boxers doing it will chop my head off in disagreement and only someone that has experienced the conditioning a pro boxer has would understand the level of conditioning required despite the supposed “over-training” a lab scientist may quantify.

It isn’t just about the physical. The psychological and spiritual factors come into it alot as well. Try and tell a wrestler to cut back on their hours and hours of wrestling because you can quantify over-training. They’ll laugh at you and keep going.

But that’s what makes extra-ordinary people. They do extra-ordinary things… things that others will always find an excuse to frown upon.

Like Boris said, give them a serious try first.

The conditioning, of the wrists, forearms, shoulders, ie what some may refer to as “banging up” is excellent. The transfer to sport is good too and like I said, the learning curve for kb as compared to say an oly lift is less steep. You can thus utilize them much easier into your routine.

Just to add a bit here, I found kettlebells available in Target, of all places.

They only had 10s, 15, and 20s, but they had a nice wide handle and a rubber coating, and came with a dvd.
This was the brand:
http://www.gofit.net/site/gofit/product/305

My general rule is if you already own a barbell and dumbbell set, then maybe consider picking up a kettlebell just for fun and variety. They’re obviously not mandatory, and they’re not curealls, but they can make cardio sessions fun. Especially in the summer when you can throw them around outside.

I’ve studied a lot of Pavel’s info, as well as Steve Maxwell and Mike Mahler. It’s all good stuff, but just remember it’s another tool in the toolbox, not the last training implement you’ll ever need.

[quote]dylan10507 wrote:
humble wrote:
FightingScott wrote:
Kettlebells aren’t really any better than thick-handled dumbbells. The swing and olympic lift moves done with kettlebells that could be done with dumbbells will be good for explosive strength if, like any weight, they’re heavy enough and they’re moved fast enough. Kettlebells are just weights and are no better than any other weights.

Not true.

Do a simple test.

Pick a weight you can curl with a dumbell. Use your thick handle as you please and curl it.

Use the same weight in a kettlebell and you will notice it is harder.

Why?

Physics my friend.

Yes you can use dumbbells for many exercises similar to what you would use kettlebells for and no one is discounting dumbbells, but to say they are the same and or no better is incorrect. Try swinging 110 pound dumbbells and you will also notice how akward it is because of their horizontal length.

O What a great point so my choice is buy a 200 dollar kettlebell or buy 2 5 pound plates to add to the dumbell. And swings are only thing they are useful for there are dozens of things you can make for under 20 dollars to do swings.
[/quote]

I sell both kettlebells and dumbells where I work. NO i’m not soliciting. Dumbells go for about $1.20 per pound and kettlebells go for about $1.30 a pound compared to dumbell prices about 1 year ago that sold for about 59 cents a pound and 69 cents for kettlebells.

This is due to China cutting back on production of these products because of pollution concerns related to the upcoming olypic games. Cut production and the price skyrocketed.

In my opinion KB’s have no benefit over dumbells, but do offer many joint problems because of the off center of gravity. These guys that use KB’s swing and swing untill their rotator cuff is destroyed. If used once in a while in conjuntion with other training it may be beneficial, but as for solely training with KB’s, I would not recomend it due to their increased risk for injury. Unless you can use KB’s with impecable form leave it for those who don’t like their rotator cuff. Overuse injuries people. They do exist.

[quote]dylan10507 wrote:
humble wrote:
FightingScott wrote:
Kettlebells aren’t really any better than thick-handled dumbbells. The swing and olympic lift moves done with kettlebells that could be done with dumbbells will be good for explosive strength if, like any weight, they’re heavy enough and they’re moved fast enough. Kettlebells are just weights and are no better than any other weights.

Not true.

Do a simple test.

Pick a weight you can curl with a dumbell. Use your thick handle as you please and curl it.

Use the same weight in a kettlebell and you will notice it is harder.

Why?

Physics my friend.

Yes you can use dumbbells for many exercises similar to what you would use kettlebells for and no one is discounting dumbbells, but to say they are the same and or no better is incorrect. Try swinging 110 pound dumbbells and you will also notice how akward it is because of their horizontal length.

O What a great point so my choice is buy a 200 dollar kettlebell or buy 2 5 pound plates to add to the dumbell. And swings are only thing they are useful for there are dozens of things you can make for under 20 dollars to do swings.
[/quote]

I sell both kettlebells and dumbells where I work. NO i’m not soliciting. Dumbells go for about $1.20 per pound and kettlebells go for about $1.30 a pound compared to dumbell prices about 1 year ago that sold for about 59 cents a pound and 69 cents for kettlebells.

This is due to China cutting back on production of these products because of pollution concerns related to the upcoming olypic games. Cut production and the price skyrocketed.

In my opinion KB’s have no benefit over dumbells, but do offer many joint problems because of the off center of gravity. These guys that use KB’s swing and swing untill their rotator cuff is destroyed. If used once in a while in conjuntion with other training it may be beneficial, but as for solely training with KB’s, I would not recomend it due to their increased risk for injury. Unless you can use KB’s with impecable form leave it for those who don’t like their rotator cuff. Overuse injuries people. They do exist.

[quote]serioustrainer wrote:
dylan10507 wrote:
humble wrote:
FightingScott wrote:
Kettlebells aren’t really any better than thick-handled dumbbells. The swing and olympic lift moves done with kettlebells that could be done with dumbbells will be good for explosive strength if, like any weight, they’re heavy enough and they’re moved fast enough. Kettlebells are just weights and are no better than any other weights.

Not true.

Do a simple test.

Pick a weight you can curl with a dumbell. Use your thick handle as you please and curl it.

Use the same weight in a kettlebell and you will notice it is harder.

Why?

Physics my friend.

Yes you can use dumbbells for many exercises similar to what you would use kettlebells for and no one is discounting dumbbells, but to say they are the same and or no better is incorrect. Try swinging 110 pound dumbbells and you will also notice how akward it is because of their horizontal length.

O What a great point so my choice is buy a 200 dollar kettlebell or buy 2 5 pound plates to add to the dumbell. And swings are only thing they are useful for there are dozens of things you can make for under 20 dollars to do swings.

I sell both kettlebells and dumbells where I work. NO i’m not soliciting. Dumbells go for about $1.20 per pound and kettlebells go for about $1.30 a pound compared to dumbell prices about 1 year ago that sold for about 59 cents a pound and 69 cents for kettlebells.

This is due to China cutting back on production of these products because of pollution concerns related to the upcoming olypic games. Cut production and the price skyrocketed.

In my opinion KB’s have no benefit over dumbells, but do offer many joint problems because of the off center of gravity. These guys that use KB’s swing and swing untill their rotator cuff is destroyed. If used once in a while in conjuntion with other training it may be beneficial, but as for solely training with KB’s, I would not recomend it due to their increased risk for injury. Unless you can use KB’s with impecable form leave it for those who don’t like their rotator cuff. Overuse injuries people. They do exist.[/quote]