Overhead Press or Bench?

[quote]Xen Nova wrote:
nothing helps overhead press like overhead press

and squats.
[/quote]

I aggree here. I was very unbalanced strength wise between bench and overhead pressing over the last year. I switched to just over head and incline and I am making quick gains in strength. I also feel like I can still bench close to what I could previously.
On a side note, a good friend of mine stated that he has never had a stronger core or more defined abs as when he focused on strict heavy military pressing.
I am doing OLAD with incline on Mon. and clean/push press on wed. The weight is just going up and up.

what is the difference between a jerk and a push press? is the difference what you do with the legs? or is it the bar placement in front/back of shoulders? they’re both explosive movements, right? ( i hope, or else i’m going crazy). waht about military press, does the bar go in front or behind the shoulders?

[quote]SWR-1222D wrote:
I’ve always benched and until the last few months I never overhead pressed.

Obviously I found out that I had a weakness with my overhead press (go figgure) and since I’ve been doing it, I’ve noticed that my shoulders and upper peck seem to have filled out better than ever before.

I’m liking overhead press better right now because it was so neglected that I’m seeing quick gains in it, and it actually feels good to do it.

It’s like my body’s thanking me for correcting the imbalance.[/quote]

Thats awsome man the same exact thing just happend to me.

A jerk involves a second dip after the initial leg drive essesntially catching the bar at lockout, like olympic lifters do. A push press involves initial leg drive only, and then you press it to lockout, like a majority of strongman competitors do.

[quote]AceQHounddog wrote:
A jerk involves a second dip after the initial leg drive essesntially catching the bar at lockout, like olympic lifters do. A push press involves initial leg drive only, and then you press it to lockout, like a majority of strongman competitors do.[/quote]

Just to expand a little to avoid future confusion, there’s two major styles of jerk - the one you usually see in the olympics is the split jerk. Explosive leg/hip drive, drop underneath, catch it overhead with a staggered stance. The athlete then steps backward a little with the front foot and brings the rear foot up to bring the feet in line. There’s also a method alternately called the push jerk/power jerk. This is essentialy the same thing, except the feet are in line with each other at the catch, not staggered front to back.

-Dan

For me my overhead press is on par with my bench for strength balance, however my delts are a bit behind. I believe my chest and triceps are dominant. To rectify the weakness overhead dumbbell press did the trick. It put more emphasis on the delts.

Rolo.

Curious, how much is your guys’ overhead press in relation to your bench? Mine is about 80%.

Rolo

I have heard 2/3 is a general rule of thumb when comparing military to bench. However, if you specialize in the overhead press that will obviously be different.

[quote]Mastermind wrote:
Curious, how much is your guys’ overhead press in relation to your bench? Mine is about 80%.

Rolo[/quote]

Thats about right

With standing OHP, where do you guys lower the bar to?

Also, towards the latter reps/ sets, if you start swaying back to push the weight up, should you call it quits there (or lower weight), or just keep pressing?

[quote]xil wrote:
With standing OHP, where do you guys lower the bar to?

Also, towards the latter reps/ sets, if you start swaying back to push the weight up, should you call it quits there (or lower weight), or just keep pressing?[/quote]

It is always best to use correct form, so if need be, lower the weight and use good form. Or you could push press it.
WIll42

Anyone have any links detailing the finer points to OHP?

Have any of you gotten good results from reverse grip OHP?

I imagine that you would have to do alot of vertical pulling and rear delt work if attempting to specialise in OHP?