Is Overeating a Problem for You?

We ran this poll below on social media. Seems like a common issue.

Statistically, overeating or binge eating is now the most common of all the eating disorders, surpassing others like anorexia.

Is this an issue for you? Or was it at one time? If so, how did you overcome it?

used to be

prioritize food it is impossible to overeat.

avoid hyper-palatable food. don’t get started, I won’t be satisfied with a normal portion.

drink more water

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Yes it’s an issue. I’m on medication that makes me hungry all the time and weight training makes it worse. I’ve overcome it by limiting my intake of restaurant food and not keeping alcohol and unhealthy snacks in the house. I cook meals that will fill me up but aren’t calorie dense. Instead of piling on bread I pile on vegetables. My lunch today was 4 ounces of chicken breast and two ounces of whole grain pasta. I padded it out with four ounces of broccoli, four ounces of cherry tomatoes, and two ounces of roasted red peppers. So I overate, but the extra stuff added less than 100 calories to the meal.

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Pretty much only socially. Going to a friend’s house, where they have lots of appetizers, then dinner, then a dessert. Plus a couple cocktails. It’s hard when the friend is a good cook (at least everything is fresh and quality), and you’re literally just hovering over food for a few hours.

But other than that, I’m pretty regimented. I just feel so much better when I eat the right things in the right amount that it’s really not too tempting to gorge on unhealthy options (plus I just don’t buy them to begin with).

Exceptions: when my wife makes homemade sourdough. Then I eat it until I can’t chew any longer.

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Volumization. Good strategy!

At least it’s the best bread!

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Yes, but not the same way it is for most people.

I can resist things like candy, pastries, chips and ice cream, but I can’t resist stuff like meat (especially roasted), eggs, cheese and yoghurt.
I’m one of the people who’d get very obese eating carnivore or keto if I don’t track calories

When I’m back in Shanghai with family, my diet is cleaner but I gain fat bc there’s so much good food (e.g., roast duck, steak, fish)

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Definitely an issue I struggled with. Specifically, I struggled with perpetual hunger, and it resulted in overeating. I “overcame” it by being hungry a lot, which would eventually result in binging. Then I tried “small frequent meals”/grazing like we all learned in the 90s to “stoke the metabolic fires” and speed up the metabolism. This led to me literally eating something every 30 minutes, watching the clock for my next chance to eat, and most likely premature aging

To finally actually fix this, the first step was taking on the Velocity Diet, my way. This was a HUGE gamechanger. It broke a LOT of my paradigms, teaching me that I was lying to myself regarding how much food I “needed” as a strength athlete and how I was just using that as an excuse to binge. I also learned what real hunger. And another big part of this was accidentally discovering what Dr. Ted Naiman refers to as “protein leveraging”, an idea also covered here.

Basically, the body hungers for 2 things: protein and nutrients. Once it has its fill of that: it stops being hungry. The issue is, most “food” today is highly processed junk that is low on protein AND nutrients, because those are expensive compared to subsidized corn sugar and seed oils. So we eat SO much of that junk to try to reach our protein and nutrient threshold and end up overeating, or we starve ourselves of these things in attempt to not overeat and then binge because our bodies WANT to live.

By focusing on protein and nutrients, we reach the threshold early, cut off the hunger, and not overeat. It’s so simple. For the first time in my life, I can fast painlessly.

I still have the Velocity Diet as my baseline these days, using it to vector toward that threshold early and then filling in the rest of my nutrition with carnivore. Because the other thing thats cool is you can’t overeat protein.

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I get the impression you would instead initially put on some bodyfat as a form of healing before your appetite recalibrated if you did a legit attempt at carnivore.

Only on the weekends

its a discipline issue

It’s important to recognize the various causes of the overeating:

  1. Too little food or skipped meals earlier in the day can lead to overeating at night. (Compensation: Your body is trying to catch up, but it’s very easy to overdo it since it takes 20 minutes or so for satiety mechanisms to kick in.)

  2. Lack of sleep triggers cravings. It can be hormonal, but I always think of it as your body’s way of seeking the energy you don’t have. You know that old saying: “You’re not hungry; you’re thirsty!” Well, add sleepy.

  3. Insufficient protein keeps hunger levels high. (The Protein Leverage Effect)

  4. Booze decreasing inhibitions; weed making food taste even better.

  5. Workout style. Some people note that really heavy weights, leg days, excess cardio, or high-volume training increases their appetites. That’s probably fine, if it’s controllable, but “over-training” for fat loss doesn’t help much if it skyrockets hunger levels.

  6. Overeating can be triggered by mood, whether it’s to “dull the pain” or to decrease/mask anxiety.

True, overeating may just be “I love me some food!” or “I suck at self-control!” but it’s a good idea to keep that other stuff in mind.

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Only at work. Seems like there’s always bagel sandwiches, chips, pizza etc. I’ll pack a healthy well rounded lunch, but it all goes to shit when there’s free subs in the conference room. Most of the time I can restrain myself, which is met with, “but you’re in shape, you can have snack or two. It’s not like you’re fat!” Bitch, shut up. I have to try really hard to keep this shitty body.

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It never has been, at least, in the sense that I had no control over the decisions to eat this or that, or even to eat at all.

I had a negative effect when intentionally “bulking” as if I got over 245lbs my sleep apnea got to the dangerous area. This is before much was known about sleep apnea, in fact, I was one of the first people involved on a sleep study overnight in the hospital.

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Yep, Once I start eating something I don’t have a very good off switch. Combine that with a learnt (thanks dad) belief that throwing away food is wasteful and three kids who don’t finish their food and it is a recipe for disaster .

I wouldn’t say I have overcome it but with some discipline I have learnt to manage it. Things like if there are biscuits or cakes at work I simply don’t have one works well. It is easier for me to say no at first rather than have one and then eat the whole plate.

Giving myself and the kids appropriate portion size and now the kids are older them actually finishing their food, means less opportunity for me to be the garbage disposal.

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I know this is a ridiculous question, but because it was sort of mentioned.

I know booze generally leads to a lot of overeating of carbs and fats, and thus overeating calories. But is there actually a mechanism where booze increases cravings for specific types of foods, or is it just food in general?

I haven’t had any booze-fueled 4 am Waffle House trips for a decade now, but if I knew then what I know now, it seems like you could use a “booze leveraging effect” to get down more steak and eggs than normal.

I have learned when in the grocery store

don’t buy it, you won’t eat it

If you buy it, you will eat it, at least some of it

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Oh yeah. I have to believe it was conditioned into me early on. My mom binge eats (so probably some learned aspect to it), and she used to be very regimented with us when it came to “meal times.” Like I wasn’t allowed to eat if it wasn’t a normal breakfast, lunch, or dinner time. So if I missed a window I’d try to eat double at the next meal. Moreoever, if we ever ate out, we went to buffets since they were more cost effective. And all day we were not allowed to eat and instructed to eat a day’s worth of food at the buffet basically. It was the same with neighborhood holiday cookouts…eat all you can while you’re there. I remember many a nights with my head in the toilet after those parties.

I have found what works best for me is simply tracking macros and calories. It has become such second nature it doesn’t even feel llike it takes time from my daily routine anymore. On top of that, I implement a weekly cheat day, where I’m allowed to eat whatever, whenever, and don’t have to count a damn thing. It let’s me scratch that binge itch, but in a controlled way that’s ultimately been very beneficial physique-wise. It isn’t for everyone but suits my personality well. My cheat day never bleeds over and I’m right back on track the next day. I get my fill and welcome the healthier foods again. And throughout the week it’s super easy to stay disciplined when I know I can enjoy myself the next cheat day. To be honest, only half the reward of a cheat day is all the different foods. The other half is just getting a break from worrying about tracking anything.

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Most of the excess food I consume is from my kids not clearing their plate. I kills me to throw away good food. Couple scoops of kraft Mac and cheese and dino nuggets saved from the trash.

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I will literally eat the crusts off my son’s pizza slices that he leaves in the plate. This is often done but the kitchen sink when no one is looking so I can save them from the bin. :joy:

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I prefer to think of it as under-metabolising :crazy_face:

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