Close Grip vs Wide Grip Rowing

Whats the difference? If I’m doing cable rows with a close neutral grip, or a wide neutral grip, what are the differences in the muscles they focus on?
Thanks

A wider grip will allow you to directly hit your mid-back muscles more effectively.

S

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:
A wider grip will allow you to directly hit your mid-back muscles more effectively.

S[/quote]

On barbell rows how wide would we be talking?

[quote]Swolegasm wrote:

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:
A wider grip will allow you to directly hit your mid-back muscles more effectively.

S[/quote]

On barbell rows how wide would we be talking?[/quote]

That’s something that’s going to be determined by your own body mechanics (longer arms, wider grip, shorter arms not as wide a grip is necessary). A wider rowing grip hits the mid back/rear delts more because of the greater angle it creates between your torso and your upper arm in the contracted position compared to the closer grips where your elbows are closer to your sides in the contracted position, which is more lats.

[quote]kingbeef323 wrote:

[quote]Swolegasm wrote:

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:
A wider grip will allow you to directly hit your mid-back muscles more effectively.

S[/quote]

On barbell rows how wide would we be talking?[/quote]

That’s something that’s going to be determined by your own body mechanics (longer arms, wider grip, shorter arms not as wide a grip is necessary). A wider rowing grip hits the mid back/rear delts more because of the greater angle it creates between your torso and your upper arm in the contracted position compared to the closer grips where your elbows are closer to your sides in the contracted position, which is more lats.[/quote]

Awh ok thanks. Funny how you wouldn’t think about these thinks until someone mentions it.

Also, a closer grip generally makes it easier for your biceps to dominate the movement if you’re prone to having that problem, because they have a greater ROM with narrower grip.

[quote]hungry4more wrote:
Also, a closer grip generally makes it easier for your biceps to dominate the movement if you’re prone to having that problem, because they have a greater ROM with narrower grip. [/quote]

Just to add you can utilize the biceps domination to help increase stress on your targeted muscle. For example, you can go alot heavier with a suponated shoulder with, lat pull down. By controlling the motion and focusing on your lats you will work them.

This has made my lats ache when I do a few sets and then switch to a lighter weight wider grip lat pull down. Don’t avoid doing something all together just because a secondary muscle may overly come in to play is what I am trying to say.

Not to hijack your thread, but I have always have had a problem with the naming of rows. To explain, if you want to target your upper back muscles, then rowing (as in a boat) is a poor choice of form. If you wanted to row more effectively, then using your upper back muscles would be inefficient and be poor rowing.
Just an observation

Eh it just means a horizantal pull. When people row oars don’t they usually use their hips and legs to do a lot of the work anyway? Wouldn’t that exclude most rowing that gets done from getting called that?