Neurotype 1B Diet - Fat Loss Stalled

You mention that you have been in a caloric deficit since February. So you essentially have been in a deficit for 5-6 months. Even if the deficit is not huge, that is WAY too long to be in a deficit. I normally recommend 12 weeks AT THE MOST. Because even if the diet is smart and the deficit conservative, past that point metabolic adaptations will catch up to you, making it really hard to keep losing fat.

Bert already mentionned the reduced conversion of T4 into T3 due to the chronically elevated cortisol level that comes from being in a deficit.

But there are others like reduced testosterone, peripheral insulin resistance (your muscles become resistant to insulin, making it harder to send nutrients there… which affects both muscle gain and fat loss). Peripheral insulin resistance is a protective mechanism that occurs when blood sugar is low due to low calories and carbs. The body wants to do everything possible to maintain a stable blood sugar level, so it makes the muscles resistant to insulin so that less carbs will be taken out of the bloodstream to go to the muscles. But it also reduces the capacty of the muscle to pull in amino acids.

Leptin is also reduced when in a caloric restriction for a long time, which greatly affects your capacity to lose fat.

The point is, 12 weeks is the longest you should be in a caloric deficit (and I personally perfer 8 to 10 weeks) after which you need a diet brak where you eat slightly above maintenance to reverse the metabolic adaptations. How long? Well, it depends on the severity and duration of the deficit. For 12 weeks of dieting I normally recommend at least a 3 weeks diet break. You were in. deficit for twice that long so you will deficintly need more than 3 weeks.

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