Marine, Order To Execute Kids

Super T

Good man. Glad you are helping defend a Marine. The PC crowd is going after an innocent man and this entire story sounds like BS.

In reality at least 8 of the innocent victims were insurgents who failed in an ambush and then sought safety among women and children. Such acts are characteristic of the enemy, particularly the one’s our resident Jihadist supports, and should be pointed out.

The ambush wasn’t initiated by the Marine’s, as Lixy well knows. His feeble attempts at propaganda have been exposed but he continues to try and get to a new audience.

These charges should have been dropped long ago.

Turning a Battle Into a War Crime
by Harold C. Hutchison
May 24, 2007
Discussion Board on this DLS topic
One of the dirty little secrets about recent claims of massacres is that all too often, they really are not massacres. The latest case of this now appears to be Haditha, with testimony now emerging that shows that at least eight of the 24 “victims” were armed terrorists. If so, Haditha would have more in common with the 2002 battle of Jenin (also claimed to be a massacre) than it does with My Lai.

The efforts to falsely claim a massacre occurred in Jenin are instructive. After the 2002 battle, the Palestinian Authority claimed a massacre had occurred. The mainstream media and human rights groups quickly echoed their claims. However, further investigations showed that not only had the body count been exaggerated, but that most of those confirmed killed were, in fact, terrorists and not civilians.

In the case of Haditha, the testimony from an intelligence officer and a liaison officer that at least eight of the dead were terrorists calls into question the claims of a massacre and cover-up. In this case, it seems that the civilians’ deaths may have been part of a firefight that resulted after an ambush.

The initial Haditha investigations uncovered some apparent discrepancies in the Marines’ stories, and a criminal investigation by NCIS was launched. This, and claims from human rights groups in the media, led to some criminal charges being filed earlier this year.

In this day and age, it doesn’t take long for a misleading story to spread out. In 2005, Newsweek reported that guards at Guantanamo Bay flushed a Koran down a toilet, triggering riots that led to a number of injuries and deaths. Earlier that year, the false claims were about torture at the detention center in Guantanamo Bay, most notably in a speech by Senator Richard Durbin on the Senate floor. In both cases, the charges were investigated. In both cases, the claims proved to have little, if any, bearing to what really happened.

As was the case with Jenin, many of the claims of torture were found to be generally unfounded, and in the few cases where lines were crossed, corrective action had been taken, in some cases immediately (one such case involved an interrogator who smeared a detainee with red ink after that detainee spat on her). Worse, the lies were already spread around by the time the truth was determined and not reported.

If the testimony about Haditha bears out, then it will just be the latest example of media misreporting. At that point, though, the real cover-up will begin. Very little, if any, effort will be made to correct the record. Politicians like John Murtha, who repeated the most inflammatory charges, will get a pass. The troops are able to fight the terrorists, and usually win.

Fighting false accusations from terrorists that get repeated by the media, human rights groups, and politicians is much harder. The worst thing about this is that the myth of the “Haditha massacre” will be used to by various terrorist groups for recruiting, and the new recruits mean that there is a greater chance that troops will get killed.
Strategypage.com

A story that turned me against the war is one from my home state.

A kid was driving a truck when a fire fight broke out. He was caught in the middle. The truck blew up. The kid was dismeboweled and burning alive. The soldier shot him twice in the head. They court marshalled him and his commanding officer, the guy from my state. After I heard about this, I turned against the war because they sent people to do a job and court marshalling them for doing it.

Unfortunately, the enemy does not play by any rules of war and we do. And they wonder why everything is screwed up over there.

[quote]lixy wrote:
superthrustjon wrote:
I’m a former marine and Sgt Wuterich is a few years older from my town, so I see this in the local paper every day. I’ve also given money towards his lawyer fees. Anyways, he’s no murderer, he was trying to bring his men home alive.

A-ha! We have a winner.
[/i][/quote]

Do you have any lists of women and children killed by suicide bombers?

[quote]superthrustjon wrote:
When it comes to house clearing in Iraq, its not like swat in the states, you run in their and shoot everything that moves, PLUS you throw a frag in before you go in every room, so chances are they never saw a single person they killed.[/quote]

There is a reason they “shoot everything that moves”. They’re mostly kids trying to survive in a war that was waged on false pretense. The way I see it (along with most of people on the planet), a lot of soldiers shoot because they value their life more than that of some Iraqi.

It’s sick and I don’t really blame them for acting that way. However, the fuckers that got them there in the first place should be held accountable.

Anyway, I’m glad you got out safe and sound. A great deal of Americans left limbs there…

[quote]Gkhan wrote:
A kid was driving a truck when a fire fight broke out. He was caught in the middle. The truck blew up. The kid was dismeboweled and burning alive. The soldier shot him twice in the head. They court marshalled him and his commanding officer, the guy from my state. [/quote]

Well, unless this guy is a medic’ I don’t see why he shouldn’t be investigated.

And believe it or not, my eyes watered upon reading this.

[quote]lixy wrote:

Well, unless this guy is a medic’ I don’t see why he shouldn’t be investigated.
[/quote]

Yeah, just what I was thinking. Better to let the kid burn and bleed to death. Dying of extensive burns and going into shock sure beats a bullet to the head.

[quote]Gkhan wrote:
Yeah, just what I was thinking. Better to let the kid burn and bleed to death. Dying of extensive burns and going into shock sure beats a bullet to the head.[/quote]

Don’t be a dick. You know exactly what I meant. Light had to be shone on the situation. The kid’s relatives deserve to know the circumstances in which the he died.

You didn’t say much besides that he was “court martialed”. There is nothing wrong with that. What would be outrageous is if he were convicted.

[quote]lixy wrote:
You didn’t say much besides that he was “court martialed”. There is nothing wrong with that. What would be outrageous is if he were convicted.[/quote]

True. I have not found out what happened to him and his commander.

Here is what happened.

I’m not defending the war. I think the war is bullshit.
I’m not defending the marine corps, I hated so much about it, hence the reason i’m no longer in it.

All I am saying, is you can’t believe what the media publishes, they make it sound as if he entered a innocent civilans home and started spraying like a monster. He was sent into a warzone and then called a murderer for doing his job. Standard procedure for a situation such as this is to either gather up wounded soldiers ASAP and get the fuck out, or to try and find the culprit and to secure the area.

The area is not secure simply by pointing at the windows, you have to clear surrounding buildings. Not to mention the person who placed the bomb was most likely in one of the buildings, because they often video tape their bombings to send as proof for a cash reward.

Building clearing in Iraq is a deadly job, the fatality rate is around 70%. It’s not like in the US where you enter the room and assess the occupants and yell at them to cooperate. Often times your just throwing a frag in and then rushing the room. I’m not saying it is right, but thats how it is done.